Talking Points to Use with Your Kids about Porn

Photo by YiorgosGR/iStock / Getty Images
Photo by YiorgosGR/iStock / Getty Images

More time on their screens during school breaks, means more time to potentially view porn. This article has some very useful conversation starters to have before or after your kids have stumbled across or intentionally landed on porn sites. Some of the highlights from the article below include:

  1. "Curiosity is normal. There’s nothing wrong with wondering how your body is the same or different from other peoples’ bodies, or even with wondering how sex “works.” Unfortunately, resources are limited, so your go-to is probably the Internet. But if you look online for pictures or videos about sex, you will see things you weren’t expecting—stuff that looks weird, gross and even scary. Some of what you see is called pornography, which is very close up and unrealistic pictures or videos of actors and actresses doing sexual things. It’s about as realistic as pro-wrestling, and most if it is violent and totally NOT the way most people look or behave when they have sex. I want you to have accurate information about bodies and even about sex, so that’s why I don’t want you going online to learn about it. On the Internet, there are no fact-checkers to make sure what’s there is accurate or even appropriate, so you are more likely to get wrong information and see pictures that people put there just to shock or distract people - or really just to make money. I will find some books for you, or show you some pictures that are more realistic, safe, and appropriate." 
  2. "Seeing (and even looking for it) doesn’t make you a bad person. By the end of middle school, most kids have seen porn. Seeing something that gives you “bad” feelings (like guilt, shame, embarrassment, fear) doesn’t make you a bad person. That just makes you a person who did something that didn’t feel “right.” The important thing is that you think about it and decide what’s right for you. That may mean not looking at porn at all, or that may mean looking at it a lot less."

https://www.girlology.com/10-conversations-have-your-kids-about-porn

Contact tracy@canwetalkhealthed.com if you would like to host a "Having the Porn Conversation" workshop for adults or parents in your home, office, school or community organization.